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Posts tagged ‘all alaska pediatric partnership’

What is Help Me Grow?

Rachel author headshotBy Rachel Boudreau, intern with Help Me Grow Alaska & the All Alaska Pediatric Partnership

Alaska is a large state with a small population. While we are fortunate to have many services to support families and children, sometimes the services a family needs are not available or, if they are, access to them can often be challenging. This can be an extremely frustrating and exasperating barrier for families trying to do their best raising happy, healthy kids.

For the last three years, a diverse group of professionals from the field of early childhood and pediatrics have worked together to find a solution, a “glue” if you will, that connects providers, community-based services, and families to ensure easier access and to help guide what new services still need to be created or expanded. That glue is a system called Help Me Grow, and we are excited to finally bring it to families here in Alaska.Help_Me_Grow_logo_update

What is Help Me Grow Alaska?

Help Me Grow Alaska (HMG-AK) is a resource and referral system that provides care coordination services and links families with services and supports throughout the state. HMG-AK is based on a national model developed in Connecticut in 2005 out of a need for a better way to connect families with community-based resources. HMG-AK is not an agency designed to offer more services, but it is intended to connect families with the resources that are already in place in communities across the state, and to help identify where more services are needed. Help Me Grow’s mission is to identify children who are at risk for developmental delays and/or behavioral problems, and then to link these children and their families to community-based and statewide resources.

Why do families need to be connected to developmental screenings?

As part of its mission, the Help Me Grow system promotes and provides a standardized tool to screen children ages 0-5 for developmental delays or disabilities. Periodical developmental screening monitors a child’s developmental milestones, such as walking, using words, expressing emotions, playing with peers, etc. Answers to the screening questions show what the child’s strengths are and will identify any areas where the child may need support or extra practice.

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The screening tool is easy to complete and can offer fun ideas for interacting with children in an age-appropriate way. HMG-AK provides families with free access to this developmental screening tool on paper or online, and the care coordinators work with the family to connect them to further evaluation, should there be any concerns of a developmental delay. When reviewing the screening results together with the parent, the care coordinator will also provide additional activities to do at home to help support the child’s healthy development while enjoying fun, free and high quality time with the child.

A child does not need to have a delay or disability to receive services or activity ideas from a Help Me Grow coordinator. The service is available and free to all families with children.

Why would a family contact the Help Me Grow call center?

HMG-AK is designed to assist families with young children looking for a broad range of support. This could be anything from questions or concerns about their child’s development or behavior to helping a family who recently moved to a community find a medical provider and social supports and community activities such as parenting groups or organized play time for kids. The care coordination model is set up to help families navigate complex situations through follow up and continued support to ensure the family feels comfortable and confident in the next steps for their child and themselves.

How do I access HMG-AK?

HMG-AK is available to anyone raising a child as well as medical providers, childcare providers and community members. All it takes is one call to the HMG-AK call center to speak with a trained care coordinator. HMG-AK’s care coordinator will answer questions a family might have and then link the family with the needed resources or find alternative supports to assist the family until the appropriate services are available. The care coordinators will follow up with the family to ensure a connection was made to the recommended resources and to discuss any additional concerns the family might have.

As Alaska’s Help Me Grow system develops, families can expect to see local Help Me Grow family-friendly events in their communities and useful educational materials to help parents understand more about their child’s development, how to manage stress (both for the parent and the child), managing difficult behaviors and more.

When will HMG-AK be available in my community?

We are currently in the very beginning phase of launching Help Me Grow in Alaska and still have a lot of work ahead of us. The first phase is focused on three regions: Norton Sound, Kodiak and Mat-Su. We are working hard and putting a lot of effort and thought into the planning, and hope to expand the program statewide, shortly after. Stay tuned through the Help Me Grow mailing list for updates!

The Best Food You Don’t Have to Buy

By Michelle Tschida, CNM, IBCLC Alaska Native Medical Center, and Tamar Ben-Yosef, All Alaska Pediatric Partnership

Here’s some food for thought: More lives could be saved annually by increasing breastfeeding rates to recommended levels than lives saved annually by car seats.

Unfortunately, breastfeeding is poorly supported in our country. Car seat laws aside, we never hear a doctor, nurse or grandparent say, “Well, using that car seat seems kind of complicated and inconvenient” or “We don’t want to make that family feel guilty about not using a car seat, so let’s not talk about it.” But parents hear those same messages when it comes to breastfeeding. What they don’t routinely hear is that their decision whether or not to breastfeed is one of the most important health decisions they will make for their child.  

Over the course of the last 30 years, the research has mounted about the overwhelming benefits to breastfeeding. Babies that are breastfed are less likely to get sick from allergies, asthma, and respiratory and gastrointestinal infections.

The benefits extend beyond infancy: Breastfeeding results in lower risks of developing childhood cancers, diabetes and obesity, in addition to lowering the mother’s risks for breast and ovarian cancer. Also, though not guaranteed, mothers have found that breastfeeding, which is a high-calorie burning activity, has helped them shed their extra pregnancy weight quicker.

A recent study has shown that more breastfed babies go on to attain higher education and earn more money than do babies who were not.

Here’s some of the science: Breastmilk contains special fats called polyunsaturated fatty acids. These fatty acids support healthy brain growth and development, placing breastfed babies in a better position to become the next Nobel laureates.

And since we’re throwing money into the mix, breastfeeding is considered an economic equalizer, meaning that all parents, regardless of race or social class, have access to the perfect food for their baby and can provide them with the best start to life.

Breastfed babies are held more and have consistent intimate contact with their mothers. This contact along with the repetitive release of the hormone oxytocin (the hormone responsible for childbirth, love, and bonding) during breastfeeding creates a special bond and closeness not easily replicated.

When we at the All Alaska Pediatric Partnership talk about the benefits of breastfeeding, there is one in particular that we look at the closest: the impact that breastfeeding has on rates of child abuse and neglect. In Alaska, where we have some of the highest rates of abuse and neglect in the nation, we also have little support for breastfeeding mothers in the areas of the state that need it most.

Women having babies in rural communities do not have access to lactation consultants like the women of Anchorage do. While our breastfeeding initiation rates are on par with other states and sometimes higher, without the much-needed support and assistance overcoming the difficulties, many of our mothers are switching to formula soon after leaving the hospital. Let’s face it, even breastfeeding does not happen stress-free.

Lastly, many smart folks have done the math and found that the U.S. would save around $13 billion per year in health care costs if breastfeeding rates increased to recommended levels.

Not motivated by doing it for your country? Do it for your own pocket, because families of breastfed babies save money, too. A year of formula costs approximately $1,300. There’s a lot you can do with $1,300, including paying a babysitter to watch the kids while the adults take a much-needed night out on a regular basis.

All of these benefits are seen best when babies are exclusively breastfed for the first six months of their lives, meaning no other foods or drinks are introduced before the baby is half a year old. After six months of age, the introduction of solid foods with continued breastfeeding through at least the first birthday will provide babies the best start to life.

Michelle Tschida is a Certified Nurse-Midwife and International Board Certified Lactation Consultant. She works at the Alaska Native Medical Center helping mothers deliver babies and provides assistance with breastfeeding. She is also a wife and mother of two young sons.

Tamar Ben-Yosef is the executive director for the All Alaska Pediatric Partnership, a nonprofit organization that works to improve health and wellness outcomes for children and families in Alaska through cross-sector partnerships and collaborations, education and communication.