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We are Expanding our Team!

ACTAlaska Children’s Trust (ACT) is expanding our team to include a vice president of philanthropy and external affairs!

This position is new to ACT. The vice president of philanthropy and external affairs is responsible for growing philanthropic giving to ACT, overseeing appropriate stewardship of existing donors, and ensuring effective communication with ACT’s constituents.

The vice president manages initiatives that build relationships with potential donors; oversees and strengthens the organization’s services to existing donors; oversees ACT communications that increases public awareness of ACT and its programs/initiatives and donor communications; and participates in the overall leadership of the organization.

ACT is looking for a dynamic individual who has a strong legacy in the development field. The individual needs to be creative and innovative. In addition, candidates need to have strong communication and public speaking skills, strong customer relations skills, and knowledge of community engagement.

Read the full job description. Applicants may email a cover letter and resume to tstorrs@alaskachildrenstrust.org or mail to 3201 C Street, Suite 110, Anchorage, Alaska 99503. The position will remain open until filled.

 

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Time for a Serious Conversation on Early Care and Learning

Join thread on October 5: A Summit on the Economic Impact of Early Care and Learning

SBeglundBy Stephanie Berglund, CEO of thread

You are invited to join thread, Alaska’s child care resource and referral network, for a conversation about how the early care and learning industry strengthens Alaska’s workforce, both today and in the future. Stop by for breakfast or lunch only, or stay all day and hear from national speakers during Investing in Alaska’s Workforce: A Summit on the Economic Impact of Early Care and Learning from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. on Thursday, October 5, at the Anchorage Marriott Downtown.

How does early care and learning strengthen our workforce? Businesses and organizations rely on child care to meet the needs of their employees each day in order to maintain a quality workforce. At the same time, it lays the human capital foundation for tomorrow’s workforce. And, having a strong workforce is critical to having a strong economy.

Plus, early care and learning invest­ments are a major component of overall education reform and, as economists will tell you, yield a high rate of return. Having a high-quality early learning program instills a strong founda­tion of cognitive and social skills in children, making them more likely to graduate high school, refrain from criminal activities, attend col­lege, contribute to the workforce, and achieve higher earnings.

During breakfast at the summit, you’ll hear from Kyle E. Yasuda, MD, FAAP. Dr. Yasuda is the medical officer for children and families at Public Health Seattle King County and provides pediatric consultation for the county’s initiative, Best Starts for Kids, a prevention and early intervention initiative for children and youth 0 – 24 years of age. He is a clinical professor in general pediatrics at the University of Washington and is serving his second term on the American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP) board of directors and is the chairperson of District VIII, a region consisting of 12 western states – including Alaska – and two provinces. In 2012, U.S. News and World Report named him as a top doctor. Dr. Yasuda has been able to utilize his experiences in primary care practice, academics, government, health policy, advocacy, and nonprofit organizations to actively advocate for the needs of children and families.

The luncheon keynote features Randy Laszewski, an audit partner in KPMG’s National Professional Practice Group in New York. KPMG supports youth and education and sustaining communities through workforce readiness. Through their corporate citizenship programs, KPMG is focused on serving children at every stage of their academic career starting at prekindergarten. Mr. Laszewski, an outspoken early childhood advocate, started his career in Atlanta, Georgia in 1981. For more than 35 years he has provided a full range of audit services to a variety of clients, primarily in the banking industry. Mr. Laszewski currently serves on KPMG’s regional and community banking practice national leadership team.

You will also hear from Nancy Fishman, the deputy director of ReadyNation, an international business membership organization that leverages the experience, influence, and expertise of more than 1,800 business executives to promote public policies and programs that build a stronger workforce and economy. Since 2006, ReadyNation members have made a bottom-line case for effective, bipartisan investments in children as the future workforce that will drive success in the global marketplace. Prior to joining ReadyNation, Ms. Fishman was the state director of the Pennsylvania Early Learning Investment Commission. The Commission, comprised of 75 senior-level business executives across the commonwealth, supports public investment in high-quality early care and education as a workforce and economic development strategy. Previously, Ms. Fishman was the director of Success By 6, the early childhood initiative of the United Way of Carlisle and Cumberland County, Pennsylvania.

She will be presenting the findings of the ReadyNation Report: Social-Emotional Skills in Early Childhood Support Workforce Success. In this national report, they examine how character skills formed in early childhood contribute to building a strong workforce with the necessary social-emotional skills for the 21st century economy.

You will also hear from business and government leaders in Alaska on how they are investing in early childhood locally. Plus, the day will be filled with group activities and open discussion.

Because of what’s at stake for both Alaska children and our society at large, it is time to have a serious conversation about where Alaska is compared to the rest of the country and where it’s going when it comes to investing in early care and learning. Register today to join the conversation on October 5.

Learn more and register for the summit on the thread website or by calling 907.265.3100.

Support provided by:

Investing in ACT

Grants to help ACT hire development director, advance children’s health care

Thank you to the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation for their recent investment in the work of Alaska Children’s Trust (ACT).

The Murdock Charitable Trust recently provided ACT with a three-year capacity grant that will allow us to add a development director to our team. The M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust was created by the will of the late Melvin J. Murdock and they provide grants to organizations that seek to strengthen the region’s educational and cultural base in creative and sustainable ways. This opportunity will allow ACT to strengthen our external relations and help grow our resources to effectively prevent child abuse and neglect.

The David and Lucile Packard Foundation has included Alaska in a multistate effort called The Finish Line Project to help secure health care coverage for all children in the United States. The Foundation supports advocacy organizations that work in states with the potential to significantly advance children’s coverage. Finish Line grantees receive financial support and communications and policy-related technical assistance to make a difference in their state. ACT is excited to work with this team of advocates to ensure Alaska’s children grow up in safe, stable and nurturing communities.

Watch our website, Facebook, e-newsletter and blog for future updates on these and other ACT efforts!

Gathering Together to Prevent Child Abuse and Neglect

Reception Raises Funds, Honors Champion for Kids

At the Alaska Children’s Trust (ACT) fundraising reception in Anchorage Wednesday night, approximately 75 people gathered together in the spirit of a common goal – preventing child abuse and neglect. View our event photos on Facebook.

The event was particularly special as it recognized an individual who has shown extraordinary dedication to preventing child abuse and neglect. During the reception, we honored Heather Harris with our 2017 Southcentral Champion for Kids award. The award recognizes an individual who has demonstrated dedication and commitment in working toward eliminating child abuse and neglect by ensuring that children are living in safe, supportive and nurturing communities.

“It is nearly impossible to talk to Heather for more than a few moments without hearing her clear commitment to children and teens – especially those who are at greater risk of experiencing trauma in their lives. The more complex the human experience, the more she is ready to engage,” reads part of Heather’s award nomination. “Uniquely, however, Heather isn’t just interested in a quick fix, but rather her strategy is first to listen and understand and then to seek collaborative solutions that don’t make life better for just one person but for a system of people.”

Currently the executive director for Big Brothers Big Sisters, Heather has dedicated two decades to our most vulnerable children and youth, engaging with Alaska Youth Advocates, Standing Together Against Rape, Alaskan AIDS Assistance Association, Anchorage Youth Development Coalition and Alaska CARES, among others. She has worked with homeless youth, been an advocate for children who have experienced sexual abuse, and has promoted positive youth development through her leadership on various boards.

This dedication and passion does not stop at the office. “At home, Heather and her husband Josh create safe space in their extended family and in their neighborhood. That space engages the neighborhood kids who instinctively know that Heather and Josh are there for them,” her nomination explains. “Neighborhood kids, children in foster care or incarcerated or abused and neglected are all welcomed by Heather and Josh – there is truly enough love and support to go around.”

“There are few people that I know who can handle seeing so much adversity in the lives of children and still feel hope and optimism about the world,” Heather’s nominator concludes.

Following the award presentation, we had the pleasure of hearing from Zookeeper and Push, members of Bikers Against Child Abuse (BACA) Alaska, who spoke about how the role of protecting our children is the responsibility of everyone – even unlikely people like bikers. A big thank you to Zookeeper and Push for their time and insights!

We would also like to thank Wells Fargo, a long-standing partner of ACT and supporter of the children of Alaska. Wells Fargo provided a challenge grant of $10,000 – which was matched in full thanks to the generosity of our guests!

Finally, thank you to CIRI for hosting the reception at their lovely headquarters, as well as to our event co-hosts, and all of those in attendance. You can see photos from the event on Facebook.

Together we can prevent child abuse and neglect!

R.O.C.K. Mat-Su: Ending Child Abuse in Our Lifetime

By Desiré Shepler, Director, R.O.C.K. Mat-Su

Love. A sense of community. A sense of belonging. The feeling of being cared for. These are things all children should have. Unfortunately, this is not always the case.

In 2013, the Mat-Su Health Foundation embarked on a community health needs assessment. As a part of the process, 23 community meetings were held across Mat-Su. Over 500 local residents and professionals spoke out at these community meetings and identified their leading goal: to keep Mat-Su children – all Mat-Su children – well-cared for and safe.

No one agency or sector can tackle this goal alone, so a group of influential champions was convened and asked to consider working together to achieve this goal. These champions, who were each working to improve the lives of children and families in Mat-Su in their individual agencies, committed to a new way of working. A way that moved beyond a single organization – or even single sector – view of the work in favor of a collective approach to working toward the common goal of promoting resilient families and ending child maltreatment. Out of this, R.O.C.K. Mat-Su, a cross-sector collaborative focused on Raising Our Children with Kindness, was born.

Made up of individuals representing the varied communities across the Mat-Su Borough, the partners of R.O.C.K. Mat-Su focus on building relationships and implementing innovative strategies in order to create systems change and connected communities. The ongoing work of R.O.C.K. Mat-Su reflects the genuine passion of a diverse group of community members to realize our vision that all Mat-Su children are safe, healthy and thriving.

Working collectively towards large-scale systems change, in our lifetime, R.O.C.K. Mat-Su will:

  • Strengthen families so all children are safe, healthy and thriving
  • End child abuse and neglect
  • And reduce Adverse Childhood Experiences.

We invite you to join us.

Heather Harris to be Honored at September 13 Reception

If you care about Alaska’s kids and want to work together to prevent child abuse and Heatherneglect, please join us at the Alaska Children’s Trust fundraising reception on Wednesday, September 13 from 5:30 – 7 p.m. at CIRI at 725 E. Fireweed Lane in Anchorage. Please RSVP by September 8 to vlewis@alaskachildrenstrust.org or 907.248.7374.

During the reception, we will honor Heather Harris with our 2017 Southcentral Champion for Kids award. Most recently, Heather became the executive director for Big Brothers Big Sisters. Prior to this new role, she dedicated two decades to our most vulnerable children and youth. Heather has worked with homeless youth, been an advocate for children who have experienced sexual abuse, and has promoted positive youth development through her leadership on various boards. Please join Alaska Children’s Trust on September 13 to thank Heather for her commitment to Alaska’s children and youth.

The suggested donation is $250 for individuals, and $1,000 for corporations, with a challenge grant generously provided by Wells Fargo. Please RSVP by September 8 to vlewis@alaskachildrenstrust.org or 907.248.7374. We hope to see you there!ACT 2017 Anchroage e-invite

Pregnancy, Nursing and Marijuana: What’s the Real Story?

By Trevor Storrs, Alaska Children’s Trust Executive Director

With the passing of the recreational use of marijuana in Alaska nearly two years ago, there has been a lot of conversation regarding the potential impacts, good and bad. One of the controversial topics discussed has been pregnant and nursing mothers using marijuana and its potential effects on newborns.

First, let me say that I’m neither a doctor nor a medical expert of any kind. Rather, this post is to inform you about the main arguments for and against marijuana use while pregnant and nursing. There are so many conflicting opinions on the topic that the sheer amount of information can make it difficult to determine how much merit to afford any of the research. So, rather than you looking through countless disparate articles, I’ve collected the main research that seemed to be accepted as true across the many articles reviewed.

It is important to note that all the literature published on the topic is based on research methods like surveys, self-reported data, and tertiary forms of testing (infant development and levels of THC in breastmilk) (Beckett, 2016). The most valid research would involve controlled human studies; however, this would be unethical. Marijuana is equated with heroin in regards to its potential for harm, so researchers can’t expose pregnant or nursing mothers to cannabis to test its effects. This isn’t to suggest that the research conducted thus far is invalid; it just means there are other research methods that could better control confounding variables.

Research has shown correlations between cannabis use during pregnancy and fetal harm:

  • There have been reports documenting a decrease in fetal growth (Merritt, Wilkinson, & Chervanak, 2016).
  • It’s also been found that pregnant women who use cannabis are at a 2.3 times greater risk of stillbirth (Abuse, n.d.).
  • In addition, prenatal exposure has been correlated with a two to three times increased risk of subsequent child maltreatment (Merritt, et al., 2016).

This data was collected from the states where recreational marijuana use has been legalized (Alaska, Colorado, Oregon and Washington).

There’s no safe amount of cannabis to consume during pregnancy, despite the reason for using and the method used to ingest it (Good to Know, n.d.). Some women think that since it’s legal, then cannabis must be safe, but the legality does not constitute its safety.

Additionally, people discount cannabis’ harm because it’s a naturally occurring substance (Good to Know, n.d.). The issue with that argument is that it suggests that all naturally occurring things are safe to consume. Since that’s not true, it can’t be used to support the lack of harm that cannabis poses. There are several naturally occurring substances that are harmful for you and your baby: lead, tobacco and poisonous berries are a few (Good to Know, n.d.). The bottom line is that the potential for harm from cannabis use during pregnancy is high.

If the risks of cannabis use during pregnancy do not pose enough of a threat, there have been even more negative effects found from cannabis use while breastfeeding. The reigning opinion is to avoid cannabis for the entire time you choose to breastfeed your child. Even though it’s preferred that you breastfeed for a year, doctors recommend that mothers breastfeed for a minimum of six months (Conover, 2016). In just one feeding, an infant will ingest 0.8 percent of the weight adjusted maternal intake of one joint, and the infant will excrete THC in their urine for two to three weeks after (Merritt, et al., 2016).

Research has found that infants exposed to cannabis through breastmilk exhibit decreased motor development and executive functioning, and poor sucking reflex. Meanwhile, mothers who use cannabis have a reduced milk supply. When you consider the poor sucking reflex and reduction in milk supply in conjunction, you get an infant with an increased risk of what’s officially called “failure to thrive,” which occurs when the infant is undernourished and fails to meet milestones in his or her first year of life.

This is a fairly new topic that has been assigned a lot of stigma and misconceptions, and the last thing I want is to add to that. The facts presented here are simply for educational purposes. What you do after reading them is entirely up to you. I’m not here to pass judgment or tell you how to live your life, but I do feel an obligation to advocate for Alaska’s children.

Children deserve every opportunity afforded to them, and parents sacrifice a lot to give their children those opportunities. However, when you use cannabis while pregnant or nursing, you are putting all those sacrifices at risk. Don’t take away from your child’s well-being before they’ve even taken their first breath. Make the sacrifice, and give your child every opportunity to thrive.

Sources:

Help Shape the Next Decade of Healthy People!

healthy peopleThe U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is soliciting written comments on the proposed framework for Healthy People 2030 that was developed by the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives for 2030 (Committee).

This framework includes the Healthy People 2030 vision, mission, foundational principles, plan of action, and overarching goals — and it will guide the selection and prioritization of objectives for Healthy People 2030.

Members of the public are invited to submit comments on the proposed framework from June 27 through September 29, 2017.

Learn more and submit your comments today!

Why Alaska nonprofits need to pay attention to the healthcare debate

Note from Alaska Children’s Trust: The Foraker Group is a statewide organization dedicated to supporting Alaska nonprofits, including ACT. We wanted to share this article from their blog on why healthcare is critical to many of the nonprofits we as Alaskans support and depend on.

Last night was one of many tense nights in the ongoing debate about healthcare in our country. There is a lot at stake for getting it right, and no easy solution for Alaskans.

One sliver of hope was the impact that many individuals and organizations in our state had when they raised their voices to engage in a way forward to a healthcare solution. I am proud to see so many Alaska nonprofits urge the U.S. Senate to engage in a clear, bipartisan process. We all need to unite in the goal of providing access to quality, affordable healthcare coverage to more Americans.

If your organization has been on the sidelines so far, there are still many opportunities in the coming weeks and months to engage. Here are 3 reasons to come to the table:

  1. Charitable nonprofits make up 12 percent of the workforce in urban Alaska and more than 50 percent in rural Alaska. In short, nonprofit organizations are an economic engine in communities throughout the state – and particularly in rural areas. Healthcare organizations represent the largest employers in Alaska’s nonprofit sector.
  2. Every Alaskan will feel an impact from these decisions. In particular, the people served by health and human services nonprofits are deeply affected by the legislation – especially those who rely on Medicaid or receive insurance through the individual market. Without thoughtful legislation, Alaskans will be in greater need – and we as organizations will not be able to fill the gaps.
  3. The ability of the nonprofit sector to offer health insurance coverage has an impact on every hire we make. Often it is the “make or break” decision for people who agree to take a job or stay in their job. Alaska’s nonprofits need to provide quality, affordable health insurance to recruit and retain talent.

The road ahead is going to be long. We all need to raise our voices to get to a bipartisan solution that benefits all Alaskans. We applaud the efforts of many nonprofits leaders who have raised their voice – it is an issue that affects ALL of us.

Free Screening of “Resilience: The Biology of Stress and the Science of Hope”

Alaska has one of the top five rates of child abuse in the United States. Without treatment, sexual and physical abuse and witnessing domestic violence or neglect can cause serious health and social problems that last into adulthood.

Join Providence Alaska Foundation, Alaska CARES and Alaska Children’s Trust for a free screening of “Resilience: The Biology of Stress and the Science of Hope,” a documentary that chronicles the movement among pediatricians, therapists, educators and communities, who are using cutting-edge neuroscience to disrupt cycles of violence, addiction and disease.

The free screening will take place Thursday, August 10 at 49th State Brewery Heritage Theatre at 717 W. 3rd Ave. in Anchorage. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and the screening begins at 6 p.m. A panel discussion will follow.

Please RSVP to 907-212-2554 by August 3.

resilience