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Posts from the ‘Guest Blog’ Category

Prevention in a Time of COVID-19: Building Resilience

Child Abuse Prevention Month Begins April 1

In this time of COVID-19, with school closures and families isolating from others, building awareness of child abuse and neglect is more important than ever. This is an incredibly challenging time for all of us, underscoring the need and opportunity to build resilience in our children and in ourselves. We at Alaska Children’s Trust are here, dedicated to supporting Alaska’s children and families. Along with our partners, we are working to provide the resources, knowledge, skills and support Alaska’s families need to thrive, despite the circumstances.

April 1 marked the first day of National Child Abuse Prevention Month. And just as we are all pulling together to prevent the spread of COVID-19, we each must play a role in raising widespread awareness of child abuse and neglect, and what we can do to build resilience and make a positive difference in the lives of children and families around us.

For far too long, Alaska has had one of the highest rates, per capita, of child abuse and neglect. But there are many, many committed individuals and organizations working to change that – and we will succeed. Check out this inspiring map to see the partners across Alaska who are participating with us in Child Abuse Awareness Month.

The first step in any real change is awareness, and Child Abuse Awareness Month is our opportunity to be part of a coordinated, nationwide movement to do just that. Here’s how you can get involved:

  • Spread the word about #Resilient19. We know the COVID-19 outbreak has created an incredible amount of uncertainty in the lives of Alaska’s families. Our hope through #Resilient19 is to share a variety of ways children, families and communities can build the resilience to overcome these challenging times. Learn more about our efforts on our website, follow us on Facebook for the latest #Resilient19 posts, and be sure to share (or post your own!).
  • Download and post our prevention month poster in your home, school, workplace or online to raise additional awareness. It’s available both as a jpeg and as a PDF.
  • Get involved in our virtual statewide Go Blue Day Rally on Friday, April 3! No matter where you live, please join us. Wear blue, make a sign, take a photo and post it using the hashtags #GoBlue4Kids #DareToBeTheOne. Make sure your post is public so Alaska Children’s Trust can share it too! It’s one small, positive and proactive way to show you care.
  • Explore our parent resources. We have compiled resources that can help with building relationships with your child, organizations that can help keep a child safe, and information we trust to support children’s healthy development.
  • Discover ways to make a difference with these tips for families, friends and neighbors, and the community as a whole.

While the important work of preventing child abuse and neglect and building resilience is ongoing, this dedicated month allows us to shine a spotlight on the issue, and educate and inspire others to join with us in our efforts.

We invite you to join us in raising the volume on this issue throughout April – and beyond. Alaska Children’s Trust is actively addressing this complex issue in a variety of ways, and we need and ask for your involvement as we work together for healthier children and families across Alaska. Together we can prevent child abuse and neglect.

What Gives Me Hope: Looking Back on 20 Years on the Alaska Children’s Trust Board

By Tlisa Northcutt Alaska Children’s Trust, Board Chair

As I thought about writing this post, I realized: I have spent the majority of my adult life advocating for children to be children – growing up in safe, nurturing environments, enjoying happy, healthy childhoods, free from the trauma of child abuse and neglect.

I became involved with Alaska Children’s Trust right out of college, as an account coordinator for a local advertising agency. A couple of years later, I was asked to join the board of Friends of Alaska Children’s Trust (FACT), the fundraising arm of the trust at the time. Twenty years later, I am deeply honored to serve as the chair of the Alaska Children’s Trust board.

To give you some perspective: I have been involved with this organization since before my career was established. Before I was married. Before I had my two beautiful daughters. You could say my family has grown up right along with Alaska Children’s Trust.

I have been asked why I have dedicated so much of my life to this organization and this cause. It’s simple: My heart breaks every time I think of children growing up without the love, without the support, without the opportunities, that I had. I know there is a solution. It might not be an easy one, and it might not be a quick one, but there is a solution.

I am fortunate to have found an organization and an issue I feel so passionate about early in my life. And when you feel so strongly about something, it’s only natural to want to be involved, and to give your time and treasure to make a difference, to move it forward.

And what an evolution it has been. I have seen firsthand how Alaska Children’s Trust evolved from a state entity to a private, nonprofit organization. I have witnessed the grantmaking process evolve and strong partnerships formed with direct service providers serving children and families across the state. I have watched Alaska Children’s Trust grow from a one-person staff to a flourishing, multi-faceted organization.

Along with our network of partners and supporters, we have become a resounding, collective voice for Alaska’s children and families. A statewide leader in the conversation about child abuse and neglect – both the root causes and the possible solutions. A catalyst that has everyone, from individual Alaskans to influential policymakers considering the impact of their decisions on our state’s children. Last year’s legislation directing a portion of Alaska’s marijuana sales tax to support afterschool programs is a prime example of the prioritization of Alaska’s children by our state.

I have also been asked how I continue to have hope about an issue that seems so hopeless. What gives me the most hope is that people are starting to understand and talk about the issue. Child abuse and neglect is coming out of the shadows, and becoming part of the mainstream conversation. Words and concepts like resiliency, trauma-informed care, and adverse childhood experiences (ACES) are no longer limited to the professionals involved in this important work. We as a community are beginning to understand that what happens early in a child’s life has lifelong implications. We’re grasping that adverse childhood experiences aren’t just physical abuse – it is also not having enough to eat, not having somewhere safe to go afterschool, or not having a trusted adult to talk to and count on.

We’re also starting to understand the power of resilience and the importance of trauma-informed care. We know now that a child who has endured trauma is likely acting out because of their experiences, and with the right support, they can develop the skills they need to overcome their trauma and come out stronger on the other side. There is a growing awareness that while kids might start out with the cards stacked against them, if we can help them break the pattern at some point, they can still come out with a winning hand.

Finally, what gives me hope is that we are beginning to comprehend that we can all play a role in the health, safety and success of the children in our communities. You don’t have to be a teacher, a doctor or a judge to make a difference in the life of a child. As a parent, I know that I can only do so much to keep my children safe. At some point, they are going to venture beyond the protection I can offer, and it takes each of us, as a community, working together, to create a society where children are valued and protected.

Because, at the end of the day, it’s in all of our best interests. It’s been said many times before because it’s true: Today’s children are our future. We must protect them, care for them, value them and give them opportunities to ensure a strong, healthy future for us all.   

I am deeply grateful that the founders of Alaska Children’s Trust understood this and had the foresight more than three decades ago to create this organization. I am proud that other children’s trusts across the country are looking to us as an example for operations, advocacy and partnership. And I am truly thankful to have the opportunity to be part of this organization over the past 20+ years.

My dream is that every child has the opportunity to grow up in a safe, nurturing environment, where they can dream about their futures as they grow up happy, healthy and thriving. As one of the many voices that makes up Alaska Children’s Trust and our network of partners and supporters, I know I am not alone in this dream. And I know that together we can – we will – prevent child abuse and neglect.

Tlisa Northcutt is the senior director of donor relations at the University of Alaska Foundation. She has served on the Alaska Children’s Trust board for the past 20 years, and currently serves as board chair. She was raised in Alaska and is proud to be raising her own family here.

The Glue that Gives Strength and Makes a Difference

Holidays mean different things to different people. I remember a time, as a child, it was about inconsequential things like a day to sleep in, the food and presents. As the years progressed, holidays became all about relationships – strengthening those that have been built over years, mending the ones that were damaged, and creating new ones. It is through these relationships I find the strength to grow as an individual, the perseverance to face challenges, and the comfort to be true to myself.

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Kids in 33 Alaska Communities Benefit from $1.25 Million in New Afterschool Funding

This fall, 33 communities across Alaska are seeing new or expanded afterschool programs for local children, thanks to $1.25 million in funding from the new Positive Youth Development Afterschool Grant Program

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thread and ACT: Strengthening Relationships in Early Education

At the core of quality child care is a trusting, respectful relationship between the early childhood educator, child and family.

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2-1-1 Help Line Offers the Right Help at the Right Time

211 homepage editedBy Sue Brogan, Chief Operating Officer, United Way of Anchorage  

Sue Brogan-photo for blog and e-news

Sue Brogan, United Way

 The Alaska 2-1-1 Help Line helps families quickly find     and connect with important services to meet their     needs. The phone and online service run by United Way   of Anchorage has no equal in the state. Since 2007,   specialists have answered calls from more than 244,000   Alaskans, made 330,000 referrals to more than 1,000   health and human service agencies, and logged more   than 517,000 online database searches.

But as of fall 2018, the Alaska 2-1-1 website hadn’t had an overhaul in 10 years. Ten years equals multiple generations online, so 2-1-1 was long overdue for an upgrade.

Thanks in part to a $10,000 grant from the Alaska Children’s Trust, that work got underway during fall 2018. In early spring 2019, Alaska 2-1-1 launched a modernized site that looks better, uses familiar icons to guide searchers to help, and provides a comprehensive complement to the call specialists who staff the 2-1-1 phone line five days a week.

By phone, 2-1-1 staffers provide a human touch. They listen, then respond with care and professional expertise. And while there’s no substitute for a sympathetic ear and a friendly voice, the Alaska 2-1-1 website aims for a warm online presence in trying to make the site more appealing and easier to navigate. We know that people looking for help don’t need hurdles.

Even though all calls are confidential, some Alaskans prefer to search for help online. The revised website meets them where they are 24/7. The first question on the main page is “What can we help you find?”. The second question is “Unsure of what you’re looking for? Let us help.”

Beginning on a page of descriptive icons, with a few keystrokes, searchers can define and narrow the field to find the help they need, by location and agency. The Alaska 2-1-1 database runs wide and deep; more than 9,300 services are included, and many entries feature detailed descriptions about what they offer, from child care to family counseling to housing assistance – as well as how to utilize those resources.

We redesigned the website with detailed provider information to streamline the search for help. Even so, we understand that the array of choices can still be confusing – which services, for example, will best meet my particular needs? That’s why the online search is sometimes the best prep for a call to 2-1-1, where specialists can guide callers to the provider who can best assist with the caller’s circumstances or use their knowledge to help brainstorm solutions if answers are not obvious. The website can be a helpful start, introducing people to the options available before contact with a specialist.

The importance of the partnership between Alaska Children’s Trust and Alaska 2-1-1 is clear. So many of the service providers in the 2-1-1 network involve the welfare of families and children – day care, health care, housing and nutrition. The mission of Alaska Children’s Trust is to prevent child abuse and neglect, and to ensure all Alaska children grow up in a family and community that provides them with the means to make their dreams come true. The right help at the right time is vital to that mission, and that’s the connection that Alaska 2-1-1 offers every day, by click or call.

We are grateful to the Alaska Children’s Trust for their support and partnership, and we are glad to contribute to their mission.

Alaska Childrens Trust awards grants to organizations in Alaska that work toward the prevention of child abuse and neglect.  With the generous support of its donors, Alaska Childrens Trust has invested more than $5 million in Alaska children and families to date. To learn more about available grants and eligibility, or to view current recipients and their projects, visit https://www.alaskachildrenstrust.org/grants-overview.

Families Laying Down New Tracks

A project of the Old Harbor Alliance, supported by Alaska Children’s Trust

By Amy Peterson, Program Manager

The Old Harbor Alliance was established by community leaders of Old Harbor, Alaska, to seek funding for educational programs and projects that will bring our people together to build a healthy community with strong leaders for all generations.

Over the past year, Old Harbor Alliance, with grant support from Alaska Children’s Trust, hosted a series of events for families through a program called Families Laying Down New Tracks. These events provided culturally relevant family and community gatherings that incorporated positive parenting and highlighted the negative impacts of child maltreatment.

The first event, “Who Makes the Rules?”, took place last fall. The purpose of the activity was to create commonly accepted boundaries for when we are together in a gathering-type setting.

IMG_6190“Who Makes the Rules?” This question was asked to our participants, whose answers ranged from: parents, teachers, ourselves, grandparents, the police, The Father (Three Saints Orthodox Church), and the President of the United States. The group discussed that if someone tells you they have a rule that makes you uncomfortable, you should follow your instincts, leave, and talk with a trusted adult about the situation.

Once the group finished talking about the rule makers, we discussed making rules and expectations that fit everyone. To facilitate the discussion, we introduced six categories and then invited the students to come up with rules or expectations for each category that would work for a group of people of all ages. Participants had a great time running up with their sticky notes or shouting out their ideas.

  1. Ideas are never right or wrong; they are a beginning. Rules or expectations for this category included listening, participating, respecting opinions and thoughts, trying new things that aren’t your idea, encouraging others to speak up, and never saying someone’s idea is stupid.
  2. Humor. Rules or expectations for this category ranged from laughing, smiling, having fun and being friendly, to saying “no” to bullying and never making fun of someone.
  3. One person speaks at a time. In this category, participants said to ask questions, pay attention, not to interrupt, take turns, talk to someone new, and include everyone.
  4. Respect: give it to get it. Students had a lot to say about this category, offering rules like telling the truth, saying please and thank you, sharing, and being kind, grateful, positive, safe and responsible. Things to avoid included fighting, stealing, hitting, shouting, and laughing at others.
  5. Working together. Sharing, listening, teamwork, being helpful, and picking up after yourself were popular rules in this category. Participants also offered suggestions like “everyone is important,” “if you disagree, work it out,” “encourage and compliment each other,” “acknowledge each other’s feelings,” “use positive words and a positive tone,” and “check on your elders to see if they need anything.”
  6. Listening. This category also inspired many ideas, like “give your full attention,” “be still while someone is talking,” “be quiet so everyone can hear,” “wait for a good time to ask a question,” “encourage others politely to be quiet and still,” “respect your elders” and remember that “everyone’s time is important.”

When the group was finished sharing their thoughts and ideas, the participants had snacks and made posters to be shared around the village. Since this first event, participants have been seen sharing these ideas with others during gatherings.

This was a great beginning to our program, Families Laying Down New Tracks. We thank Alaska Children’s Trust for their support of healthy and positive gatherings! Quyanaa!

Alaska Children’s Trust awards grants to Alaska organizations like the Old Harbor Alliance, which are working to prevent child abuse and neglect. With the generous support of our donors, we have invested more than $5 million in Alaska children and families. Learn more about our grant program, grant recipients and upcoming opportunities on our website.

Summer – your opportunity to strengthen your family

It’s summer vacation! While summertime schedules can pose challenges, summer also provides lots of wonderful opportunities for families to focus on building stronger connections.

Strengthening Alaska’s families is what Alaska Children’s Trust is all about, so we’re pleased to share these national and local resources that can help your family not just survive, but thrive, this summer!

Keep learning. Did you know that children can lose up to two months of essential math and reading skills during the summer months? Fortunately, there are lots of ways you can support learning during summer vacation. Mark your calendar for National Summer Learning Week, July 8 – 13. This week is all about keeping kids learning, safe and healthy during the summer, ensuring they return to school in the fall ready to succeed. Check out the family toolkit for tips and resources, like:

Go to camp. From math and sports to gardening and entrepreneurship, there is a summer camp for nearly every age and interest! Explore the possibilities with your child in the Alaska Parent Summer Camps and Programs Resource Guide and the Anchorage Daily News Summer Camp Guide.

Eat healthy. According to The Children’s Lunchbox, a program of Bean’s Café, there are approximately 21,000 children in the Anchorage area who don’t have enough healthy food to eat. This problem becomes even more severe in the summer for children who rely on school lunch programs. Families who need help can connect with numerous programs that offer free meals to children during the summer, including:

Find quality child care. thread is Alaska’s Child Care Resource and Referral Network, offering services to families, early childhood educators, early childhood education programs, and communities statewide. If you need help finding or choosing quality child care, or are looking for child care financial assistance, thread is a great place to start.

Get some fresh ideas. Best Beginnings is a public-private partnership that mobilizes people and resources to ensure all Alaska children begin school ready to succeed. Their website has great resources on growing readers, building strong families and engaging community around the importance of a child’s early years.

 Have resources to add? Please share with us on Facebook or Twitter

Be Safe on the Water this Summer: Safe Boating Practices for Families

By the Alaska Office of Boating Safety

The Alaska Office of Boating Safety strives to help Alaskans avoid dangerous situations on the water and use safe boating practices. One of our programs, the Kids Don’t Float program, is a statewide injury prevention effort developed to address Alaska’s high youth drowning rate. This program educates participants about the effects of cold water immersion and provides life jackets through the Kids Don’t Float life jacket loaner board component.

While we focus on teaching children throughout Alaska why it’s important to wear a life jacket, we also want the adults in their lives to have the same understanding. Wearing a life jacket is a vital part of safe boating for everyone, not just for children.

Generally accepted by researchers to be water temperatures below 70 degrees Fahrenheit, cold water is virtually all water in Alaska, and it has a physical effect on everyone, regardless of age, swimming ability, or boating experience. Cold water immersion plays a significant role in many of Alaska’s boating fatalities. During each stage of cold water immersion, a life jacket can greatly improve a person’s chances of survival by increasing the distance between their airway and the water, assisting with rescues and self-rescues, keeping a person floating even when disabled or unconscious, and providing protection in the event of an ejection.

In Alaska, anyone under the age of 13 is required by law to wear a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket when on an open boat, on the deck of a boat, or when being towed. Along with making sure your children are wearing safe and serviceable life jackets, you can set a good example, not to mention taking a step to ensure you’re around for their future, by wearing yours.

Consider a situation in which you are unable to help during an emergency (perhaps you experience a medical issue or fall out of the boat). Will your family know what to do? Empower passengers, including children, to be safe and responsible boat passengers by educating them on what to do in the event of an emergency. Make sure they know how to handle the boat, location of emergency equipment, how to call for help, and how to assist in a rescue.

Because nearly all boating-related mishaps involve operator controllable risk factors, most are both predictable and preventable. Effective risk management is the key to safe and enjoyable boating. To keep yourself and your children safe while boating, follow these safe boating practices:

  • Always wear a life jacket
  • Carry emergency communication and distress signaling (alert and locate) devices on your person
  • Attach the engine cut-off device when underway (powerboaters)
  • Equip the boat with at least one means of re-boarding
  • Complete a pre-departure check
  • File a float plan
  • Brief all passengers on the location and operation of emergency equipment and how to stop, start, and steer the boat
  • Check the weather and dress appropriately

BSlogo Idea OneTo learn more about what we do, visit alaskaboatingsafety.org or find us on social media. You can contact us at officeofboatingsafety@alaska.gov with questions or comments, or to schedule a Kids Don’t Float presentation at your school or organization.

Painting the stories of trauma and resilience

Steve Gordon found himself in the midst of the conversation about childhood trauma and resilience “quite by accident.” One year ago, the renowned artist and University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) art instructor tasked his students with a mural-painting project that explored issues of contemporary interest. The topic: the headline-topping opioid epidemic. But instead of having his students just read articles on the issue, Steve invited several “recovery advocates” to come to his class and share their life stories.

“You can talk about the epidemic generically but when you hear a personal story, you have more compassion for the struggle and the heroic effort it takes to get into recovery,” Steve shares. “Many of these people had childhood trauma and that made their addiction more understandable. It got me interested in the correlation between ACEs (adverse childhood experiences) and addiction.”

For the next series of murals, Steve decided to have his class focus on ACEs, and the Resilience After Trauma: An ACEs Mural Project was born. Adverse childhood experiences are when children are exposed to toxic stress like child abuse, domestic violence, an incarcerated parent or intergenerational trauma. These types of experiences can impair the development of a child’s brain and body so profoundly that the negative effects increase their risk of experiencing many of the physical, social and behavioral ills our communities face today, like substance abuse, homelessness or mental illness. However, there is hope – by learning healthy coping techniques and establishing supportive relationships, children and adults can develop resilience, which minimizes the impact of ACEs on their lives.

“Here we saw what can happen if a child undergoes trauma and doesn’t get any help or learn any resilience strategies,” Steve explains. “If children don’t get resources on the front end, you could be paying to put them in prison on the other end. It’s tragic.”

For the ACEs mural project, Steve invited another group of recovery advocates to speak to the students, who asked questions, took notes and photographed the speakers. “To hear what happened to them as kids, and how they are fiercely working to help others now, it was inspiring. It was impactful for me and everyone involved,” Steve says.IMG_7080

Then came the hard part – figuring out how to visually convey the stories of trauma and resilience in a 6-foot by 10-foot mural. Students worked together in teams to create three murals, and Steve invited four professional local artists to create pieces as well. Two local organizations – Alaska Children’s Trust and Alaska Native Medical Center Auxiliary – provided grants that helped with the cost of supplies.

We were pleased to be able to support Steve and his students in this unique and collaborative effort to raise awareness of adverse childhood experiences and the power of resilience,” says Trevor Storrs, president/CEO of Alaska Children’s Trust. “That’s exactly what our community investment grants were created for. By working together, we can create real change and turn the tides on child abuse and neglect in Alaska.”

Once the murals were completed, the class invited the speakers back for an unveiling of their work. Each group shared how they visually depicted the life-impacting moments – both negative and positive – into the mural.

The students also wrote artists’ statements explaining how the process impacted them personally and how they incorporated the stories into the paintings. “Working on this mural together, holding these images and words from Tarah’s life has had a profound effect on all of us and we are grateful to her for what she shared with us,” wrote the team of students who painted Tarah’s story. “She is the inspiration behind every layer of paint.”IMG_7156

Each mural is accompanied with the artists’ statements, along with information about ACEs and resilience, making it possible for viewers to understand the project without any introduction. “Most of the general population hasn’t heard about ACEs. I hope the murals with information on ACEs and resilience help people to be more aware,” Steve says. “ACEs are real and they have a lasting, lifelong impact on the development of kids’ brains. But you can proactively give children the tools to deal with stress and become resilient. The people in these murals are evidence of that. They provide hope to others.”

The murals will make their public debut February 7 at the Church of Love in Anchorage during a reception hosted by Alaska Children’s Trust and UAA with support from Alaska Native Medical Center Auxiliary and REAL About Addiction.

The February 7 reception is just the first stop for the freestanding artwork, which are designed to be highly transportable and easily displayed in public areas, including outdoors. From February 8 – March 8, the murals will be on display at the Anchorage Downtown Bus Depot. On March 8 – 9, they move to the Dena’ina Center for the Bean’s Café Empty Bowl Project. During the rest of March, the murals will tour the University of Alaska Anchorage campus. Throughout April, they can be seen at the Loussac Public Library, and in May, they will be featured at the Mat-Su Health Foundation. All displays are free and open to the public.

Steve continues to seek opportunities to share the murals – and the messages they contain. “It’s exciting that art is helping to make a difference,” he says. “Art inspires change by shining a spotlight on the issue of ACEs and offering hope.”