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Show Your Support – Order Your ACT Merchandise!

You can show your support of Alaska Children’s Trust (ACT) – and of Alaska’s kids – by purchasing heirloom birth certificates, marriage certificates and license plates. All proceeds benefit ACT and our mission to prevent child abuse and neglect in Alaska.
Birth Certificate | $45
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The heirloom birth certificate is available for any person ever born in Alaska. There are two certificates to choose from: “Polar Bears” by Jon Van Zyle or “The Embrace” by Rie Munoz. These beautiful, 12” x 9” certificates commemorate the birth of anyone ever born in Alaska, with proceeds benefiting children across the state. Order today!
Marriage Certificate | $55

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These heirloom-quality marriage certificates, which debuted in 2001, are available in three designs featuring artwork by Alaska artists Dale DeArmond, Byron Birdsall and Rie Munoz. In addition to supporting ACT, these 12” x 9” certificates are a wonderful way to commemorate one of the most important days in a couple’s relationship. Order today!
License Plate | $100
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The ACT KID plate was designed by a Unalakleet 5th grader, and offers an excellent way to show your support for Alaska’s kids! Order today!
Order Yours Today!
The certificates and license plates can be ordered easily from the ACT website. Order yours today and start showing off your support of Alaska’s children!

See Our Start Small. Dream Big. Interview Series

The inspiring individuals featured in our Start Small. Dream Big campaign had such amazing stories, we just had to hear more! We’re excited to debut a series of brand new Start Small. Dream Big. interviews with: Jason Dolph, Anchorage Fire Department Captain. Jason, a second-generation firefighter, discusses how his childhood experiences inspired his career choice, and how his positive influences taught him to keep pushing on no matter what. Apayo Moore, Alaska Artist. Apayo didn’t think she was an artist – but her community did. Because they believed in her and encouraged her to pursue her talent, today Apayo is creating art – and hope. Paul Thacker, Professional Snowmachiner. Paul may have lost the use of his legs in an accident, but now he’s using that experience to inspire others, while continuing to drive his career to even higher success. Lakhita Banks, BP Teacher of Excellence. Thanks to one teacher’s encouragement, Lakhita discovered her love for reading and writing. Here, the BP Teacher of Excellence recalls the “one small event” that propelled her career in education. Check out all the videos on our website, and share your thoughts on our Facebook page!

Prevention Month Tip 4: It Helps to Plan Together

Having a plan for handling difficult situations with your child before they happen can make it easier. Problem-solve with a friend or loved one so next time an issue comes up, you’re better prepared.

Talking, planning and problem-solving with others is one way to build parental resiliency. While no one can eliminate stress from parenting, resiliency can help parents deal with stress in a positive, healthy way. Resilience is the ability to manage and bounce back from all types of challenges that emerge in every family’s life. It means finding ways to solve problems, building and sustaining trusting relationships including relationships with your own child, and knowing how to seek help when necessary. Don’t worry if this doesn’t come naturally – building resiliency takes time. But the pay-off is worth it – strong families raise great kids!

During National Child Abuse Prevention Month in April, discover other ways to build resiliency, strengthen families and raise great kids! Visit our website to learn more, and check out our prevention month poster series, featuring fun and helpful tips about building resiliency.

A Rural Perspective
As National Child Abuse Prevention Month comes to a close, it is important to remember that we all have a part to play in creating healthy communities for our children to grow up in. Apayo Moore, an artist from Dillingham and a voice for our “Start Small. Dream Big.” campaign, shared her perspective at First Lady Walker and Ms. Toni Mallott’s fundraiser in February. Remembering her childhood in a rural community, Apayo said, “Small acts of kidness that we do can change a child’s attitude and can be the factor that redirects them from becoming a dependent of society and into a caring and contributing member of the community. I know this because this was me. Life was hard, but with encouragement from everyone around me and our Yup’ik reaction, to instinctively care for others in need, here I am, doing the best that I can, paying it forward.” We all have a responsibility to ensure all children live in safe, stable and nurturing environments. We can achieve this by ensuring we all create positive relationships with children. All it takes is a small investment like talking to children, encouraging them, or teaching them new things. Thank you to Apayo Moore for your inspirational words. You can read the entirety of her speech here.

Prevention Month Tip 3: It Helps to Take a Break

Taking time for yourself isn’t selfish – it can help you be a better, healthier, more patient parent. So pick a date, schedule a babysitter and go do something you enjoy!
When parents set aside time to recharge their batteries, they’re actually building parental resiliency, which is the ability to bounce back from challenging circumstances. Don’t worry if this doesn’t come naturally – building resiliency takes time. But the pay-off is worth it – strong families raise great kids!
Want more tips on how to build resiliency, strengthen families and raise great kids? Just visit our website!
Also check out our National Child Abuse Prevention Month poster series, featuring fun and helpful tips about building resiliency.

Prevention Month Tip 2: It Helps to Remember the Positive

Kids can be a big challenge, but they can also be an incredible joy. When you’re going through a tough time, take a moment to remember the positive about your child – a sweet gesture, a funny joke or something that made you proud. Don’t worry if this doesn’t come naturally – building resiliency takes time. But the pay-off is worth it – strong families raise great kids!
During National Child Abuse Prevention Month in April, learn how you can help prevent child abuse and neglect by building resiliency and strengthening families. Visit our website to learn more about building resiliency in both parents and children.
While you’re there, see, download and share our prevention month poster series, featuring fun and helpful tips about building resiliency.

Prevention Month Tip 1: It Helps to Have a Sense of Humor

When it comes to kids, sometimes you just gotta laugh. Having a sense of humor can help you get through tough times – and bring your family closer together. Don’t worry if this doesn’t come naturally – building resiliency takes time. But the pay-off is worth it – strong families raise great kids!

During National Child Abuse Prevention Month in April, learn how you can help prevent child abuse and neglect by building parental resiliency. What does that mean? Parents who are emotionally resilient are able to:

• Bounce back during tough times
• Maintain a positive attitude (most of the time!)
• Solve everyday problems creatively
• Model for their children how to manage daily stress

Learn more about parental resiliency – what it is, why it’s important and how to develop it – on our website. Also see, download and share our prevention month poster series, featuring fun and helpful tips about building resiliency.