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Celebrating a Summer of Learning

By Thomas Azzarella, Alaska Afterschool Network Director

This summer thousands of kids checked out books at libraries, learned to fly fish, built robots, volunteered in their communities, got connected to their culture, and explored Alaska’s wilderness while participating in summer programs across Alaska. Not only did these summer programs give kids a fun and safe summer vacation, they inspired learning, strengthened resiliency, and supported working families.AK Map

Youth programs promoted summer learning by engaging children in a variety of exciting activities in order to prevent the summer learning loss. Summer learning loss occurs when youth do not actively participate in learning opportunities, such as reading, the arts and recreational activities.

Kids who are not engaged in enrichment activities throughout the summer are more likely to start the school year behind their classmates. By offering opportunities for youth to develop new skills, work cooperatively with their peers, and get connected to caring adults in their communities, these programs help build resiliency. In addition, working parents were able to stay focused at work while knowing their kids were in a safe and nurturing environment.

We at the Alaska Afterschool Network, a program of Alaska Children’s Trust, celebrate and commend all that our kids have achieved this summer by taking a look at these six outstanding summer programs from across Alaska.

21st Century Community Learning Center (CCLC) E.A.S.T.

Fairbanks, Alaska

21st century.jpegThe 21st CCLC E.A.S.T. offered summer adventures to students by integrating the subjects of science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM). The program was offered free of charge for students attending Denali, Hunter and Joy Elementary 21st CCLC Programs within the Fairbanks North Star Borough School district.

Every morning during the summer program, students worked on inquiry-driven projects in their chosen field of study. Afternoons at the academy featured a variety of choices in shorter STEAM exploration classes, ranging from GPS scavenger hunts and physics experiments, to virtual reality photography and more.

The goal of the academy was to engage students in exciting, hands-on STEAM projects to build literacy in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), while also mitigating summer learning loss.

For more information:

www.k12northstar.org/domain/1093

Courtney.havrilek@k12northstar

(907) 590-3782

Echo Ranch Bible Camp

Juneau, Alaska

Echo Ranch Bible Camp offered summer camp programs for kids and youth ages 7 to 18. The programs were nine weeks of camps – weeks full of activities, games, great conversations, and time for kids to think about life and where they’re headed.EchoRanch

Echo Ranch summer camps offer fun, exciting, healthy environments for kids, positive role models, activities specifically designed for their age group, time to hang out with friends, and the opportunity to learn about a God who loves them.

Zip lining, archery and horseback riding are just a few of the positive activities that the youth engage in during the summer. Many kids find their week at Echo Ranch to be a positive experience they look back on for years to come.

For more information:

www.EchoRanch.org

www.facebook.com/echoranchbiblecamp/?fref=nf

(907) 789-3777

Bristol Bay Borough Parks and Recreation Department

Naknek, Alaska

The Bristol Bay Borough Parks and Recreation Department’s summer program engaged kids with art project days, team-building sessions and science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM) activities.Bristol Bay Park and Rec

The program included various outdoor enrichment activities to help keep the youth active. One of their most memorable outdoor adventures was during a beach walk, when they spotted more than a dozen beluga whales.

For their big field trip, the group was able to fly out to Brooks Camps in Katmai National Park for a day of adventure. This was the first time that many of them had been out to the falls.

In addition, the group volunteered their time and picked up trash around the community, visited the elders’ home, sent letters and goodies to deployed soldiers, and even visited their local fire and EMS department. All of the activities that the youth engaged in were geared to improve their summer learning.

For more information:

www.bristolbayboroughak.us/adminstration/park_and_recreation/index.html

dwood@bbbak.us

(907) 246-7665

Boys & Girls Clubs of the Kenai Peninsula

Kenai, Alaska

Club members had an exciting summer at Boys & Girls Clubs of the Kenai Peninsula summer programs. On any given day, nearly 300 youth walked through the Club doors during the summer months.

Ben Boettger/Peninsula Clarion

Ben Boettger/Peninsula Clarion

Five of the Clubs in the Kenai area operated through the summer months. Kenai, Soldotna and Nikiski served youth Monday-Friday from 7:30 a.m. – 6 p.m, and the teen programs operated during the afternoon and evening hours.

These programs fed kids through the state of Alaska summer federal meals programs, which ensured healthy meals were available to all kids under 18 who live in Kenai Peninsula communities.

Clubs provided high yield activities and targeted programs, which actively encouraged young people to attend more frequently, and also employed Five Key Elements for Positive Youth Development. These elements include a safe, positive environment; fun; supportive relationships; opportunities and expectations; and recognition.

The Boys & Girls Clubs of the Kenai Peninsula summer program is vital to the Kenai Peninsula community, providing youth access to high-quality summer learning experiences.

Through all of their programs, it was their goal to  ensure that every youth who walked through their doors was on track to graduate from high school on time with a plan for their future demonstrating good character and citizenship and living a healthy lifestyle.

For more information:

www.bgckp.com

www.facebook.com/bgckp/

info@positiveplaceforkids.com

(907) 283-2682

Northeast Muldoon Boys & Girls Club

Anchorage, Alaska

The Northeast Muldoon Boys and Girls Club kept their participants active throughout the entire summer with educational activities. B&G Club NE Muldoon 1.jpgTo promote such activity, the club went on field trips four out of five days of the week. On the non-field trip day, the club focused on academics to deter summer learning loss. The field trips ranged from visiting the park to fishing on the Kenai River.

The Boys and Girls Club enjoyed partnering with other organizations in order to optimize summer learning. Most recent partners included U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Soul River Inc.

Katrina Mueller from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service introduced and educated youth about fishing in hopes to get them excited about fish and wildlife. By getting youth enthusiastic about fishing, the service strived to inspire conservation of fish and wildlife, along with the lands and waters that support them.

NE Muldoon Fish.jpegIn addition, Soul River Inc. focused on the youth and fishing. The program connected inner city youth and U.S. military veterans to the outdoors through stimulating outdoor educational experiences such as fishing. These youth ultimately became leaders through the mentoring provided by the U.S. veterans. By having the Soul River youth work with the Boys and Girls Club members, they were able to reflect the mentoring that they received from the veterans and to develop as individuals.

Through all of these experiences, the Northeast Muldoon Boys and Girls Club promoted summer learning and provided opportunities for both the youth and community to benefit from.

For more information:

www.bgcalaska.org

www.facebook.com/Northeast-Muldoon-Boys-Girls-Club-126628350752324/

(907) 333-2582

The PEAK Program

Sitka, Alaska

This summer, The PEAK Program (Playing. Enrichment. Art. Kids.) utilized project-based learning opportunities to help teach children how to use science, technology, engineering art and mathematics (STEAM) in real life.PEAK

This summer the youth who attended The PEAK Program had a variety of STEAM-focused activities to choose from. Programs included Outdoor Club, Star Wars Club, Scooby Doo, Harry Potter Magic Week, and Investigations and Spy Week. During the investigations week, youth engaged in investigating a staged crime scene that they were in charge of solving.

In addition to the weekly learning units, the students participated in different activities such as sewing, origami, obstacle courses, cooking, tool use, games and other various activities throughout Sitka. Through the instructive activities, The Peak Program was able to help children develop thinking skills, while also building friendships as well as a sense of community.

For more information:

www.seerschoolsitka.org/peak.html

www.facebook.com/The-PEAK-Program-in-Sitka-Alaska-931480073581910/home

peakprogramsitka@gmail.com

(907) 747-6224

Thomas Azzarella is the director of the Alaska Afterschool Network, a program of Alaska Children’s Trust. The network is the only statewide organization dedicated to increasing afterschool and expanded learning opportunities for school-age children, youth, and families in Alaska.

 

 

 

From Foster Care to a Forever Home

By Amanda Metivier, Executive Director of Facing Foster Care in Alaska

There are currently more than 2,800 children in foster care throughout Alaska. A record number only expected to increase. Being in foster care is overwhelming, exhausting, and comes with a lot of challenges. Even with all of the chaos, it still offers a sense of security and relief to those who have experienced abuse and neglect.

Jamie ACT Blog Pic

Jamie and her little buddy, Hannah. Jamie taught Hannah how to ski in 2013, and they have been friends since then. Both of these girls love to be up at Eaglecrest skiing/riding together!

18-year-old Jamie Yaletchko is the definition of resilient! Jamie recently aged-out of foster care in Juneau, Alaska. Jamie spent three years in the system, moved seven times, and had nine caseworkers, and nine counselors.

When asked to describe her time in the system, Jamie says, “It was difficult … when I first went into foster care I was separated from my three siblings, and removed from my best friend’s house. I was placed with two of my teachers, with a long-term goal of adoption. In the end it didn’t work out the way we had planned. Just after I turned 16, I went in to an ‘emergency placement,’ at the home of one of my siblings. I was excited to be close to my sister, even if for only a short time. I lived in the emergency placement for nearly a year. Then I was moved to Juneau’s Transitional Living Program (TLP).”

For many youth in foster care, as they get older, plans for adoption or a permanent family become less of a priority. Foster youth are expected to start acquiring life skills at age 16, to help them transition in to self-sufficient adults.

Jamie quickly learned she would need to start taking care of herself. She remained at TLP while attending Thunder Mountain High School, and worked three jobs. “My OCS (Office of Children’s Services) goal was no longer permanency, and I was just working hard to graduate and receive my diploma. TLP became a little bumpy for me with the rules, so I was moved to Cornerstone Emergency Shelter. I was in Cornerstone for two months. One day, I just refused to go back, so I was considered a ‘runaway.’”

Many foster youth end up being placed in emergency shelter care or residential programs when foster homes aren’t available. These programs can be challenging for teenagers as they are required to follow strict rules to meet child care licensing regulations and have limited access to family, friends, and the community.

“I was finally placed with my boss, who became a foster parent just for me! I lived with her and her husband for six months. Next, I moved in with my boyfriend until I aged-out of the system at 18.”

Jamie experienced a lot of transitions in just three short years, but never gave up on herself and her dream of being adopted. “Today, I am working hard on school, work, life, and I am currently in the process of being adopted by the Kasler family! They are also adopting my brother, who they are currently fostering. My brother, Joey, is 19. My little siblings, Jayelene and Jesse, live in Washington with our oldest sister, who is currently fostering them, but trying to adopt as well. In the end, we all ended with permanency. The way I see it, all of us have a forever home and a place to go; Joey and I of course can also always go to our sister’s house. My siblings and I have all had lots of different experiences between foster homes, families, and our experience/life in OCS.”

Alaska has just over 1,400 licensed foster homes, oftentimes making it difficult to keep large sibling groups intact. Jamie was separated from her siblings as they all moved between different foster homes. Throughout her journey in the system, Jamie advocated to maintain close relationships with her siblings and even graduated high school early. Today, Jamie continues to stay busy working as a clerk at the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence Juneau (NCADDJ), a barista for Heritage Coffee Co, and a ski instructor at EagleCrest. She’s also the Southeast regional representative for Facing Foster Care in Alaska, working to share her story and empowering others to do the same.

Amanda MetivierAmanda Metivier is a founding member and the executive director of Facing Foster Care in Alaska (FFCA). Amanda spent three years in Alaska’s foster care system before aging out. She is a foster parent, holds a bachelor’s and master’s in social work, and has been a longtime advocate for foster care reform. Amanda has worked for nearly 13 years to amplify the voices of foster care youth and alumni to promote systems change and create a community of support for current and former foster youth throughout the state. 

Economic Benefits of Early Care and Learning

By Stephanie Berglund

Like many of us who support early childhood, thread understands that early care and learning is a critical part of Alaska’s infrastructure, supporting families and allowing them the choice of maintaining employment while raising a family.

jim calvin presenting report (2)

Jim Calvin presenting the 2015 Economic Impact of Early Care and Learning Report.

Now, a new report released in October 2015, 2015 Economic Impact of Early Care and Learning Report by the McDowell Group, reveals that the early care and learning sector has an even greater impact on Alaska’s economy than we suspected — to the tune of half a billion dollars.

According to the report, the early care and learning sector accounts for $512 million in economic activity statewide. This economic activity boasts benefits for working families and employers now, and for our state’s young children exponentially for many years to come.

The report, prepared for the Alaska Early Childhood Coordinating Council (AECCC) of which thread is a member, highlights some eye-opening data that exposes the crucial role early care and learning plays in Alaska’s economy. For instance:

  • Nearly one in six workers — or 15 percent of Alaska’s workforce — depend on early care and learning services in order to go to work each day.
  • Wages attributed to these workers are estimated to be over $2 billion.

Many Alaskans are familiar with the need to find affordable and quality child care, yet most are unaware that licensed/regulated care is in short supply. Across the state there are only enough spaces for half of the children who need care. This number is much higher in some communities and, across the state, the demand continues to grow. In a parent survey conducted as part of the report, 46 percent of parents with children under 6 years of age report difficulty finding care.

On top of the shortage in access to quality early care and learning, tuition is expensive for families and they are fronting the majority of the cost. The report finds that families are contributing $223 million, or 65 percent, of all funding spent on early care and education ($343 million) in Alaska.

Early care and learning services are often the family’s highest monthly expense – in some cases even higher than mortgage/rent. While families are paying a premium for early care and learning services, the programs are struggling to pay livable wages for early childhood teachers. Most of the early childhood workforce is employed in state-licensed child care and their annual wages are only 40 percent of the overall statewide average. For example, a child care teacher makes an average annual salary of $20,676 compared to a public sector employee earning $54,528+. Wages in this sector are too low to attract and sustain a high quality workforce. Higher quality early care and learning programs come at a cost, yet we know families are unable to afford more. The report brochure highlights the difference in the cost for higher quality care.

In addition to the economic impact of the early care and learning sector on today’s workforce and economy, the report reviews and highlights the benefits of investing in early care and learning. Not only does the sector play an important role in Alaska’s economy, the report highlights research suggesting that investments in early care and learning boost productivity in the workforce over the next several decades.

Quality early care and learning is a smart long-term investment for government. Research highlighted in the study shows early childhood education can reduce negative and costly outcomes for government and society. This includes savings associated with reduction in crime, delinquency, reliance on welfare, and health care costs coupled with improvement in educational achievement. Investments in early care and learning will have an increased economic impact in Alaska.

thread, Alaska’s Child Care Resource and Referral Network, is committed to strengthening access to affordable and high-quality early care and learning. We invite you to share the 2015 Economic Impact of Early Care and Learning Report with others, talk with your lawmakers about the importance of early care and learning for Alaska, and join Alaska Children’s Trust and other early childhood supporters in strengthening our families and young children.

SB pictureStephanie Berglund is the chief executive officer of thread, Alaska’s Child Care Resource and Referral Network. She oversees statewide network services aimed at advancing early care and learning, specifically to improve the quality, accessibility and affordability of child care in Alaska. Stephanie lives in Anchorage with her husband and 10-year-old daughter. She is deeply committed to improving the quality of life for children and families in Alaska.

Teens Making a Difference Across Y-K Region

By Eileen Arnold

Teens Acting Against Violence (TAAV) is a youth-led violence prevention program that was created in 1996. A group of teens wanting to speak out against the bullying they saw in their school and community worked with the Tundra Women’s Coalition (TWC) to create TAAV with the intention of putting out public service announcements and giving presentations to their peers about healthy relationships.

TAAV members at 2015 Lead On

TAAV members at the 2015 Lead On! summit

Almost 20 years later TAAV is still thriving and has grown in many ways. TAAV is open to any middle or high school student in Bethel and meets Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays after school. Most meetings focus on teen issues like teen dating violence, STDs, alcohol awareness, body image, self-esteem, and suicide prevention.

This philosophy for youth in the TAAV program is that they are an integral part of the work that TWC is doing, and their outreach is the biggest arm of prevention that TWC has. TAAV activities are structured around leadership development, cultural relevance, work experience, outdoor education, skill building, presentations, healthy activities, and the crisis and family work that is the mission of TWC.

TAAV members travel all over the Yukon-Kuskokwim region to teach their Healthy Relationships presentation with their teaching video that they wrote and created with Delta’s radio station, KYUK, in 2005.

TAAV youth teach the presentations with the understanding that peers learn best from their peers and that the skills TAAV members gain from doing these presentations are a great boost to their knowledge, their confidence, and their public speaking skills.

In 2015, TAAV traveled to Mekoryuk, Kwethluk, Napakiak, Nunam Iqua, and Alakanuk to give presentations as well as in the Bethel Regional High School and the Kuskokwim Learning Academy in Bethel. They were also featured presenters at the Lead On! youth summit and at the Council of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault’s prevention conference.

TAAV is well known in the Bethel community and partners with many prevention groups and volunteers for many community events. TAAV is always part of TWC’s awareness events like Domestic Violence Awareness Month and Sexual Assault Awareness Month. At large, well-known TWC events like the annual Yukegtaaq Celebration and the Children’s Fair, TAAV members are critical volunteers that contribute to the success of these events. TAAV members also partner with Bethel’s Diabetes Prevention, Nicotine Prevention, and Suicide Prevention coalitions by volunteering at events and showing up for awareness raising activities.

In 2011 TAAV members designed and implemented a youth leadership camp styled off of the Lead On! summit for Alaska youth that is hosted by the Alaska Network on Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault every year. TAAV members always attend this event and wanted to create their own camp focused more on subsistence and cultural activities of the region and make it available to more youth from this region. Teens Lead Ahead is still going strong five years later and consistently has youth representing the Y-K Delta with elders and speakers from the region speaking to youth and leading them through subsistence activities in the summer.

In partnership with KYUK, TAAV is in the process of creating another Healthy Relationships video. The first one was created in 2005 and focused on warning signs of unhealthy relationships. This new video focuses on modeling healthy relationships and how to keep your support network when youth begin engaging in dating relationships.

TWC and TAAV have also invested in the financial future of TAAV by starting an endowed fund with the Bethel Community Services Foundation with generous donations from the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority and the Rasmuson Foundation. TAAV members fundraise all year long to do a downstates Outward Bound trip (for many it’s their first time out of Alaska) and while fundraising is a great thing for youth to be engaged in, it began to take up too much of the youth and the coordinators’ time. By creating an endowed fund it will hopefully free up time for TAAV members to carry out their mission and do less fundraising in the future.

The most exciting update for TAAV recently is that the University of Anchorage Justice Center published a quantitative study of 96 former TAAV members. “Overwhelmingly, TAAV members reported satisfaction with the TAAV experience. Specifically, TAAV participants reported that they felt accepted and supported in the program. Additionally, respondents reported that they had made friends in the program and learned new skills to help build a healthier life.” The study concluded that “TAAV is poised to remain a model for prevention, intervention, and education of middle and high school students in Alaska, if not the country.” The full results of the UAA Justice Center TAAV survey can be found at: http://justice.uaa.alaska.edu/research/2010/1203.taav/1203.01.taav-program-evaluation.html

TAAV has been with TWC for almost 20 years. There are five former TAAV members working at TWC currently and one former TAAV member on TWC’s board of directors. TAAV’s influence on TWC’s work and TWC itself has been immeasurable and will hopefully continue to impact TWC, Bethel, and the Y-K Delta region for another 20 years.Eileen Arnold.JPG

To keep track of TAAV happenings you can “like” them on their Facebook page: Teens Acting Against Violence.

Eileen Arnold is the executive director at the Tundra Women’s Coalition (TWC). Before becoming the director, she was the youth services coordinator at TWC for five years and supervised the Children’s Program, the Engaging Men and Boys Program, and the Teens Acting Against Violence Program. 

Show Your Support – Order Your ACT Merchandise!

You can show your support of Alaska Children’s Trust (ACT) – and of Alaska’s kids – by purchasing heirloom birth certificates, marriage certificates and license plates. All proceeds benefit ACT and our mission to prevent child abuse and neglect in Alaska.
Birth Certificate | $45
VanZyle 2-10-2003.fromwebheirloom_Birth.fromweb

The heirloom birth certificate is available for any person ever born in Alaska. There are two certificates to choose from: “Polar Bears” by Jon Van Zyle or “The Embrace” by Rie Munoz. These beautiful, 12” x 9” certificates commemorate the birth of anyone ever born in Alaska, with proceeds benefiting children across the state. Order today!
Marriage Certificate | $55

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These heirloom-quality marriage certificates, which debuted in 2001, are available in three designs featuring artwork by Alaska artists Dale DeArmond, Byron Birdsall and Rie Munoz. In addition to supporting ACT, these 12” x 9” certificates are a wonderful way to commemorate one of the most important days in a couple’s relationship. Order today!
License Plate | $100
kidlicenseclip.sm

The ACT KID plate was designed by a Unalakleet 5th grader, and offers an excellent way to show your support for Alaska’s kids! Order today!
Order Yours Today!
The certificates and license plates can be ordered easily from the ACT website. Order yours today and start showing off your support of Alaska’s children!

See Our Start Small. Dream Big. Interview Series

The inspiring individuals featured in our Start Small. Dream Big campaign had such amazing stories, we just had to hear more! We’re excited to debut a series of brand new Start Small. Dream Big. interviews with: Jason Dolph, Anchorage Fire Department Captain. Jason, a second-generation firefighter, discusses how his childhood experiences inspired his career choice, and how his positive influences taught him to keep pushing on no matter what. Apayo Moore, Alaska Artist. Apayo didn’t think she was an artist – but her community did. Because they believed in her and encouraged her to pursue her talent, today Apayo is creating art – and hope. Paul Thacker, Professional Snowmachiner. Paul may have lost the use of his legs in an accident, but now he’s using that experience to inspire others, while continuing to drive his career to even higher success. Lakhita Banks, BP Teacher of Excellence. Thanks to one teacher’s encouragement, Lakhita discovered her love for reading and writing. Here, the BP Teacher of Excellence recalls the “one small event” that propelled her career in education. Check out all the videos on our website, and share your thoughts on our Facebook page!

Prevention Month Tip 4: It Helps to Plan Together

Having a plan for handling difficult situations with your child before they happen can make it easier. Problem-solve with a friend or loved one so next time an issue comes up, you’re better prepared.

Talking, planning and problem-solving with others is one way to build parental resiliency. While no one can eliminate stress from parenting, resiliency can help parents deal with stress in a positive, healthy way. Resilience is the ability to manage and bounce back from all types of challenges that emerge in every family’s life. It means finding ways to solve problems, building and sustaining trusting relationships including relationships with your own child, and knowing how to seek help when necessary. Don’t worry if this doesn’t come naturally – building resiliency takes time. But the pay-off is worth it – strong families raise great kids!

During National Child Abuse Prevention Month in April, discover other ways to build resiliency, strengthen families and raise great kids! Visit our website to learn more, and check out our prevention month poster series, featuring fun and helpful tips about building resiliency.

A Rural Perspective
As National Child Abuse Prevention Month comes to a close, it is important to remember that we all have a part to play in creating healthy communities for our children to grow up in. Apayo Moore, an artist from Dillingham and a voice for our “Start Small. Dream Big.” campaign, shared her perspective at First Lady Walker and Ms. Toni Mallott’s fundraiser in February. Remembering her childhood in a rural community, Apayo said, “Small acts of kidness that we do can change a child’s attitude and can be the factor that redirects them from becoming a dependent of society and into a caring and contributing member of the community. I know this because this was me. Life was hard, but with encouragement from everyone around me and our Yup’ik reaction, to instinctively care for others in need, here I am, doing the best that I can, paying it forward.” We all have a responsibility to ensure all children live in safe, stable and nurturing environments. We can achieve this by ensuring we all create positive relationships with children. All it takes is a small investment like talking to children, encouraging them, or teaching them new things. Thank you to Apayo Moore for your inspirational words. You can read the entirety of her speech here.

Prevention Month Tip 3: It Helps to Take a Break

Taking time for yourself isn’t selfish – it can help you be a better, healthier, more patient parent. So pick a date, schedule a babysitter and go do something you enjoy!
When parents set aside time to recharge their batteries, they’re actually building parental resiliency, which is the ability to bounce back from challenging circumstances. Don’t worry if this doesn’t come naturally – building resiliency takes time. But the pay-off is worth it – strong families raise great kids!
Want more tips on how to build resiliency, strengthen families and raise great kids? Just visit our website!
Also check out our National Child Abuse Prevention Month poster series, featuring fun and helpful tips about building resiliency.

Prevention Month Tip 2: It Helps to Remember the Positive

Kids can be a big challenge, but they can also be an incredible joy. When you’re going through a tough time, take a moment to remember the positive about your child – a sweet gesture, a funny joke or something that made you proud. Don’t worry if this doesn’t come naturally – building resiliency takes time. But the pay-off is worth it – strong families raise great kids!
During National Child Abuse Prevention Month in April, learn how you can help prevent child abuse and neglect by building resiliency and strengthening families. Visit our website to learn more about building resiliency in both parents and children.
While you’re there, see, download and share our prevention month poster series, featuring fun and helpful tips about building resiliency.

Prevention Month Tip 1: It Helps to Have a Sense of Humor

When it comes to kids, sometimes you just gotta laugh. Having a sense of humor can help you get through tough times – and bring your family closer together. Don’t worry if this doesn’t come naturally – building resiliency takes time. But the pay-off is worth it – strong families raise great kids!

During National Child Abuse Prevention Month in April, learn how you can help prevent child abuse and neglect by building parental resiliency. What does that mean? Parents who are emotionally resilient are able to:

• Bounce back during tough times
• Maintain a positive attitude (most of the time!)
• Solve everyday problems creatively
• Model for their children how to manage daily stress

Learn more about parental resiliency – what it is, why it’s important and how to develop it – on our website. Also see, download and share our prevention month poster series, featuring fun and helpful tips about building resiliency.

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